Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Goodbye to Farewell Mr. Bunting 
A last goodbye 
A shocking goodbye 


Goodbye (English sonnet) 

He knew his world was coming to an end
He saw it clearly written in her tears
A love a celebration of the years
Is stricken by the realms of let’s pretend
-
What words can put a meaning to his fears
What meaning can give reason to portend
To help a broken heart alone transcend
This cloud of pain till hope again appears
-
And in that long and lasting memory
When all that’s left is just to say goodbye
So far away from all the hows and whys
-
He stares ahead at all which now must be
And in a distance hears an angel cry
And there within his lover’s arms he dies 


A heartbreaking mystery leads to tears and this English sonnet. We know something sad was happening in this sonnet from the first line. This sonnet draws us in, but holds back what we all want to know. This sonnet is an example of holding back in order to build suspense. More, it is an illustration of the confusion surrounding death. In the end, is it only the person who dies? 

The sonnet is heartbreaking enough. I am not going to recount Arlene's death. Instead... As a masonic orator, my forte was the Masonic Funeral. I was in big demand. From 1999 to 2010 I performed 147 funerals and served as chaplain at least as many services. The ritual last 6 to 10 minutes (depending on delivery). The service and prayer a steeped in Masonic legend so that it may be performed in the broadest religious environments. 

That being said. a little lesson. I was once asked, by the family, to perform at a Greek Orthodox church. The priest had never seen a Masonic funeral and was very suspicious. He didn't want to have the masonic service at his church. I met with him in private and let him read the words I was going to recite. He agreed to let me perform, in respect to the family. There were two other concessions. We masons could not perform the processions that normally are part of a Masonic funeral and we were asked not to wear our aprons. At the reception. all the guests stood, talked and ate. I hand one toast of ouzo with the widow and her two sons. Then here comes the priest. He had watched me perform. He was very sorry for his behavior. "Thank you for opening my eyes", I still can remember him saying. He said I and the Masons were always welcome to his doors. 

Let us put aside the daily hum-drums for more important things. Too often the regiment of what we are use to clouds us from seeing that flower at our feet. It fools us. We don't have time. That's not the way we used to do it. And so routine welcomes one more guest. Let us put that aside. We are so much more. Our world has so much more to offer. And when comes the time to say goodbye, we may say thank you. But until then we can enjoy. 


Some music to go with the sonnet: Apparat "Goodbye" 

Warning - proceed at your own discretion 

The most well known 2-word poem is entitled ‘The Shortest and Sweetest of Songs’ and it simply reads ‘Come Home’ by a poet named George MacDonald. Never heard of that one? Well, when we think of poetry and movies, what film comes to mind? That's right "Dead Poets Society". And what's the big scene? It seems the writers of Saturday Night Life decided to make some improvements to that scene. 
Last warning - Not for the squeamish. "Farewell Mr. Bunting – SNL" 
(No poet was harmed in this making of this sketch.)

Thank you for stopping by and your kind support 


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Just as the body goes into shock 
after a physical trauma, so does 
the human psyche go into shock 
after the impact of a major loss. 
Anne Grant

12 comments:

  1. A part of you certainly died with Arleen. She was deep in your heart and took a piece of you with her when she left.

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    Replies
    1. But what a life!
      Thank you for your warm understanding

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  2. That last quote is so true. I had some trauma that I lived through. It really effects you life in a long term way but slowly and mindfully you and touch it with loving kindness. Great post!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for this affirmation
      and this treasured insight

      Delete
  3. This was sad Martin! But good. You sure know your stuff.
    Lisa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This coming from someone who puts together such enjoyable posts.
      Thank you

      Delete
  4. It is a deeply poignant and beautiful poem. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for sharing its effect on you.

      Delete
  5. 'Things' are not always as they seem.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You got that right
      Thank you for all you bring

      Delete